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The Dating of the Last Supper Interview

by Brant Pitre April 13, 2017 10 Comments

 

In this video Dr. Brant Pitre will discuss the different theories on the dating of the Last Supper, and, if in fact, the Last Supper was a Passover meal.


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Brant Pitre
Brant Pitre

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10 Responses

James Bejon
James Bejon

April 17, 2017

This was a fascinating discussion. Thanks to all involved. I’m actually (for whatever it’s worth) quite partial to what’s here referred to as ‘the Essene hypothesis’ (though I’m not sure of how well-established the link is between the 364-day calendar and the Essenes), which Pope Benedict XVI seems open to, though doesn’t explicitly endorse. I have a write-up of my chronology of Jesus’ ministry here in case anyone is interested (http://www.academia.edu/24267678/A_Chronology_of_Jesus_Ministry), where Jesus’ final week is discussed towards the end of it.

I’m also interested by the link provided above to the meal on the 16th Nisan (http://aronbengilad.blogspot.com.au/2016/01/the-last-supper-brant-pitre-and.html), and will have to look into this more.

Really fascinating stuff.

James.

Beth Cook
Beth Cook

April 15, 2017

Really, this is an extraordinary piece. Thank you. I am SO GLAD to hear a scholar reconcile the Synoptic and Gospel of John timing of the Last Supper and Passion using references, logic accurate translation and 1st century Jewish context. This interview makes me want to study more. QUESTION: Please identify other recognized biblical scholars who share Dr. Pitre’s point of view.

Br Gilbert Bloomer
Br Gilbert Bloomer

April 15, 2017

Very interesting discussion but Dr Pitre has not taken into account that the Last Supper occurred on Nisan 16 on the second night of Passover in a Passover Havurah Meal. see http://aronbengilad.blogspot.com.au/2016/01/the-last-supper-brant-pitre-and.html

Yolanda
Yolanda

April 14, 2017

It all sounded very interesting. I loved how you all three new exactly what your tallking about. I have been listening to Dr. Pitre here & there what ever is free. But I do want to buy one of your books. I am a mother of for young Adults & have lost two Now agnostici. They claim Bible is man made and that there is no real history on Jesus. Also saying if Jesus is God why all good now the Old teastment he was a hard and not very nice. So anything I can learn I do want to be able to share. Thank You fGod bless you

Father dennis ruane
Father dennis ruane

April 14, 2017

What a great presentation makes clear things I have wondered about

Michael Kowalewski
Michael Kowalewski

April 13, 2017

The Orthodox Churches use leaven bread at Mass citing that the world for bread in Greek is artos , regular bread. The word in Greek for unleavened bread is azymous. The Gospels use artos for the Lord’s Supper.

kathy lane
kathy lane

April 13, 2017

Plausible explanation of apparent discrepancies in gospels. Very interesting.

Luz
Luz

April 13, 2017

What an amazing explanation on the apparent controversy and digression between the synoptic gospels and John’s account of the Last Supper. I am not a scholar by any means, I’ve just started studying the Bible last year. I truly appreciate Dr. Pitre’s knowledge and ability to explain something so difficult in an easy way for anyone to understand. God bless his work, his mind and his life so that he may continue helping us newbies learn a bit about the wonderful book of our faith, the Bible. Happy Easter!

James H Dobbins, PhD
James H Dobbins, PhD

April 13, 2017

With regard to “buying” the shroud of Jesus, Rebecca Jackson of the Shroud Center in Colorado has a very interesting research paper in which she suggests that the Shroud of Turin may have been the table cloth used at the Last Supper. Her argument is based on a significant body of physical evidence found on the Shroud itself, including stains on the cloth from a place setting that corresponds to the number of people at the meal, as well as the material itself – a very expensive herringbone weave which would never have been used for a shroud, plus the likelihood that there would not be any stores open for business at this time in which to buy the shroud.

James H Dobbins, PhD
James H Dobbins, PhD

April 13, 2017

This is an interesting discussion. I tend to side with the view that John is correct in setting the day of the Last Supper a day earlier. Besides the fact that John (and only John) says “on the day before”, we look at the account of the Transfiguration in Luke which tells us what they talked about. They talked about the Exodus Jesus was about to begin in Jerusalem, fulfilling the Moses prophesy that God would send another “like me” to lead the people. You begin the Exodus with a Passover meal, with a specific sacrifice of the Pascal lamb. As Catholics, we say that the Last Supper was the first Mass, at which there is a sacrifice. We hold that Jesus was both the High Priest and the Sacrifice at the Last Supper. If there was a lamb at the Last Supper, the meal would have had two sacrifices, a lamb and Jesus. This contradicts the theology of the Mass at which the Apostles were ordained as priest, since there can only be one sacrifice at a Mass and at a Passover Meal. I think Jesus took the Passover Liturgy, which commemorated the freedom of slavery to Egypt, and transmigrated that into a new liturgy, possibly a day earlier than the rest of the community would be eating their lamb, which Jesus initiated by His words of consecration, particularly the consecration of the Chalice when He said ‘This is my Blood of the new covenant … which is shed for the forgiveness of sin." The whole purpose of the Last Supper was not to commemorate the Exodus from Egypt but to initiate the New Exodus to the new Promised Land, made possible by Jesus’ sacrifice offered for the forgiveness of sin, forgiveness of sin being necessary for entry into Heaven. Given the theology of the Last Supper, sacrificing a lamb to commemorate the Exodus from Egypt would make no sense.

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